Mother and Child

FACE TO FACE VISITS

At Supervision Monitors we understand the importance of parenting time.

 

Our monitors assure parenting time is comfortable, safe and non-threatening to the child. We approach each visit with the child's well-being as our central goal.

 

The monitor is present at all times during the visit to observe the activities and interactions between parent and child.  

 

Visits can occur in the home, in the community, or via video call. 

Monitors will intervene if the actions and/or interactions of the parent become a concern. The parent will be instructed on what needs to change for the visit to continue. We always reserve the right to end the visit.

 

We provide detailed documentation of each visit which is often used in court hearings.

 

VIDEO CALLS

We now offer video call monitoring anywhere in the U.S.

 

The parent and child log into our dedicated Zoom account where our monitors observe and document the topics of conversation and the interactions between the parent and the child. As with face-to-face visits, guidelines must be followed.

 

Documentation of the calls is provided. Video calls are a good way for parents to stay connected and involved with their child.

 
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DOCUMENTATION

During the supervised visit, the monitor is always able to see and hear the child and parent. Much information can be gathered through observation. All interactions are documented in detail including any redirection a parent may have required for not following the visit guidelines.  

 

The documentation of the  visit is critical. Being able to accurately report the activities and interactions during the visit in a neutral and unbiased manner is the only way the courts will gain an understanding of the parenting time. Imagine the impact of a poorly documented visit.

Our monitors will appear in court, if required. However, we do not make any recommendations to the court regarding custody.

 

CHILDREN & SUPERVISION

Children from divorced families may experience emotional problems such as difficulty adjusting to change, loss of interest in social activities, feelings of guilt, depression and anxiety. They may also develop behavioral problems.

 

In situations where supervised parenting time is in place, children are often confused and need reassurance.

 

Both parents play a major role in how their child will adjust to the supervision. Providing a simple, age appropriate explanation as to why a monitor will be present during parenting time is critical. Explaining that a trusted adult will be with them on their visits is important.